Foreign Assistance Act of 1961

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Foreign Assistance Act of 1961

Legislation in the United States that consolidated a number of civilian foreign aid programs under a new organization, the U.S. Agency for International Development. It also split military from non-military foreign aid.
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109-177), amending sections 489 and 490 of the Foreign Assistance Act (22 USC 2291h and 2291) section 722, the INCSR was expanded to include reporting on the five countries that export the largest amounts of methamphetamine precursor chemicals, as well as the five countries importing the largest amounts of these chemicals and which have the highest rate of diversion of the chemicals for methamphetamine production.
Section 515(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act limits to six the number of Armed Forces personnel permanently assigned to SA billets in an SCO, unless another number specifically is authorized by the Congress.
In addition, the Foreign Assistance Act strictly prohibits US foreign assistance to any country that "engages in a consistent pattern of gross violations of internationally recognized human rights".
Then, in April 1979, the US cut off economic assistance to Pakistan, except food assistance, as required under the Symington Amendment" Symington Amendment to the US Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, due to concerns about Pakistan's nuclear programme.
USAID, a demoralized agency operating under a 1961 JFK-era Foreign Assistance Act that has grown from 100 to 2,000 pages of congressional earmarks and barnacles, aa "goals," 45 "priority areas," and 247 "directives," currently handles less than 40 percent of our bilateral aid, while DoD controls a remarkable 22 percent, and there are 20-plus other "spigots.
The July 1994 coup strained The Gambia's relationship with Western powers, particularly the United States, which until 2002 suspended most non-humanitarian assistance in accordance with Section 508 of the Foreign Assistance Act.
According to Amnesty International, US governments, including Obama's, have supplied arms to Israel despite this being a direct violation of the US Foreign Assistance Act, which states, "No security assistance may be provided to any country the government of which engages in a consistent pattern of gross violations of internationally recognized human rights", which includes "acts of torture or cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment, prolonged detention without charges and trial, causing the disappearance of persons by the abduction and clandestine detention of those persons, and other flagrant denial of the right to life, liberty, or the security of person".
For necessary expenses of the Department of State and the Foreign Service not otherwise provided for, [$5,360,318,000] $8,960,016,000, of which [$1,117,000,000] $1,648,000,000 is for Worldwide Security Protection (to remain available until expended) : Provided, That the Secretary of State may transfer up to $137,600,000 of the total funds made available under this heading to any other appropriation of any department or agency of the United States, upon the concurrence of the head of such department or agency, to support operations in and assistance for Afghanistan and to carry out the provisions of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, to be allocated as follows:
4) On April 3, 1948, President Harry Truman signed the Foreign Assistance Act ("FAA").
All employees working on contracts approved and funded by the United States under the Foreign Assistance Act, generally providing for cash sale of military equipment, materials and services to allies, if the contract is performed outside the United States
In addition, I direct the Secretary of State and the Administrator of USAID to take the following actions with respect to conditions in voluntary population planning assistance and USAID grants that were imposed pursuant to either the 2001 or 2003 memoranda and that are not required by the Foreign Assistance Act or any other law: (1) immediately waive such conditions in any current grants, and (2) notify current grantees, as soon as possible, that these conditions have been waived.
Absent a presidential determination of a democratically elected Cuban government, the President could end the embargo only if Congress were to amend or repeal LIBERTAD and various other embargo-related statutes, including provisions in the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, the Food Security Act of 1985, the Cuban Democracy Act of 1992, the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 1999, and the Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000 (TSRA).
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