Agriculture

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Agriculture

The production of food through the raising of crops and/or animals. The development of agriculture approximately 9,000 years ago is considered to be one of the most important revolutions in human thinking, one that made civilization possible. The trade of agricultural products, such as wheat or coffee, gave rise to the first exchanges. Even now, agricultural products are among the most important commodities that are traded. Very often, agriculture may only be performed in certain areas. Zoning laws regulate where farming and ranching may or may not take place. See also: Agribusiness.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Wooster group works with food crops and nonfood ones, such as trees, shrubs, flowers, and turfgrass.
Food crop production and marketing are some of the key components of the informal sector that involve mostly women in Sub-Saharan Africa.
The authors note that collectively the CSMAPS comprise only 23% of the Earth's continental area, but account for over 60% of the world's food crops and over 75% of all commercial energy consumption and fertilizer usage.
The urea requirement includes 4,000,752 tons for food crop sector, 11,304 tons for animal husbandry sector, 118,488 tons for fishery sector and 1,194,648 tons for the plantation sector.
At present, several food crops are being tested in open fields by an array of Indian and multinational companies.
Residues of pesticides banned in foods years ago, such as dieldrin, continue to show up regularly, and potent toxins are still legally applied to food crops.
How safe is such food and the impact of newly developed food crops on humans comes under the purview of the Health ministry and the depart- ment of medical research.
In the new study, Dean Kopsell and colleagues note that farmers grow about 240,000 acres of sweet corn in the United States each year, making it an important food crop.
Global food security in a changing climate depends on the nutritional value and yield of staple food crops.
The vault was opened last year to ensure that one day all of humanity's existing food crop varieties would be safely protected from any threat to agricultural production, natural or man made.
That rule would require companies to notify FDA of their intent to market a bioengineered food crop, and provide the agency with scientific data demonstrating the crop to be safe to eat.