Florin

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Florin

1. A gold coin struck in Florence in 1253. Used as a currency, it was so successful that other countries in medieval Europe adopted their own gold coins and called them florins.

2. See: Aruban florin.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first piece of the series Hungarian gold florins from the Middle Ages was the gold coin of Charles I in 2012, with the aim of providing a full picture of good quality coins in the history of medieval Hungarian money history, which preserved their value and were widely accepted by foreign merchants as well.
Primarily they are a means to educate and raise awareness of the values of Hungarian money history, the historic predecessors of our national currency, the golden florins.
The MNB will present the Golden florin of Albert commemorative coin, to be issued as the fifth piece in the series, in Sopron, at the official opening ceremony of From denarius to forint history of the Hungarian currency, a travelling exhibition to be organised in cooperation of the Magyar Nemzeti Bank and the University of Sopron.
Many businesses, including retail outlets, would most likely also accept florins on the same basis.
Interest rates on euros and florins for terms up until the end of 2007 would be identical, but for longer terms the rates could differ, depending on expectations about re-born sovereign Dutch monetary policy into Stage 2 and beyond.
At the start of Stage 2 (January 1, 2008), 1:1 convertibility of euros to florins at the Dutch central bank would be suspended indefinitely.
Florence, under the penalty of one thousand florins.
In the latter year it is recorded that Bonaventura, son of Salomone of Terracina, obtained a contract to carry on the business of money-lending in the Florentine town of Monte San Sabino [Savino] for six years starting from 1 October 1420 in return for an annual payment to the Florentine Camera of twenty-eight florins.
In 1422 the same Bonaventura is associated with his son, our Salomone, in the practice of money-lending in Prato under a ten-year contract starting i September 1422, calling in this case for semiannual payments of 150 florins, or a total Of 3000 florins.
At a cost of nearly twenty florins for the materials alone, the coat represented the equivalent of almost half a year's wages of one of the skilled marble carvers employed at that time by the artist in the Medici Chapel.
In contrast, it cost only three and a half florins to ship the figure from Pisa to Rome (Ricordi, 105).
35) The horse was sold for fifteen florins, which Buonarroto considered a good price (Carteggio, 1:241, 2,56, 266).