financial supermarket

(redirected from Financial Supermarkets)

Financial supermarket

A company offering a wide variety of financial services such as a combination of banking services, investment services, and insurance brokerage.

Financial Supermarket

A financial institution that offers a wide variety of services to clients. For example, a financial supermarket may serve as a broker, insurance company, and real estate agent. Some financial supermarkets may even offer services approximating banking services. This is both convenient for the client and profitable for the supermarket. Financial supermarkets are made possible largely through deregulation.

financial supermarket

A financial services company that offers customers a wide variety of financial products, generally including insurance, stocks, bonds, real estate services, and annuities. Financial supermarkets are convenient but may not offer the best deals on each of the financial products they sell.
References in periodicals archive ?
based storefront facilities consulting firm Financial Supermarkets Inc.
DFIS, INVESTMENT BANKS, AND LEASING COMPANIES HAVE BECOME ENDANGERED SPECIES DUE TO FINANCIAL SUPERMARKETS IN SHAPE OF BANKS EATING INTO THEM.
It caters to transportation, telecommunication, food and beverage, banking, financial, social security, real estate, electric, industrial, commerce, and IT sectors being the most important financial supermarkets in Chile.
1) They passed the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, guaranteeing large financial supermarkets that can only be too big to fail, while prohibiting the SEC from being able to require regulation of investment bank holding companies.
In its heyday, AIG had a market value of $180 billion, and was slated to become one of 10 major global financial supermarkets in the world by the end of the decade.
You don't have to go back to square one to make use of financial supermarkets.
The reasoning put forth at the time: Financial supermarkets (just like regular supermarkets) are in the public interest and it isn't practical to wall off the meat department from the bakery or grocery department.
In the bull market of the late 1990s, when stock prices reached absurd heights and congressional deregulation encouraged the largest financial services companies to get even bigger, executives weren't shy about touting "turnkey" solutions and "all-in-one" financial supermarkets.
It also tells the blow-by-blow story of the strategies many community banks must employ to grow in an era of mega-mergers and financial supermarkets.
Yet despite the promise of financial supermarkets, chief financial officers of U.

Full browser ?