birth rate

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Birth Rate

The number of babies born per 1,000 women of childbearing age in a population. This may be used to help calculate population growth. It is also called the fertility rate.

birth rate

see POPULATION.

birth rate

the number of people born into a POPULATION per thousand per year. In 2004, for example, the UK birth rate was 11 people per 1,000 of the population. The difference between this rate and the DEATH RATE is used to calculate the rate of growth of the population of a country over time. The birth rate tends to decline as a country attains higher levels of economic development. See DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION.
References in periodicals archive ?
32) While there is a notable absence of scholarly investigation focusing directly on the correlation between same-sex marriage and fertility rates in the United States, some helpful related data is available.
THE fertility rate for women aged 40 and over has risen above that for the under-20s for the first time since 1947.
Mapa showed the country's fertility rate in 2013 at 3 percent, the highest, alongside a similar rate in Laos, in Southeast Asia.
Predicting a further drop in fertility rates in the years to come, Sabban referred to creating initiatives to help support and raise awareness about the challenges of raising a family in the modern world as a step forward in encouraging more young women to have children.
According to data for 2011 for Europe, the total fertility rates ranged from 1.
Dubai has already laid down basic objectives to maintain current fertility rates due to the continuous decline over the past years.
In the maps below, regional fertility rates are averaged from 2009 to 2013.
ySTANBUL (CyHAN)- The southeastern province of E[currency]anlyurfa was found to have the highest fertility rate in the country, with women there having an average of 4.
To wit, the Austria-based International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) recently unveiled research showing that if the world stabilizes at a fertility rate comparable to that of many European nations today (roughly 1.
Government policies must adjust to sharp worldwide decline in fertility rates
Decreasing fertility rate, however, is worrisome till the sex ratio does not improve, they say.
At present fertility rates there is no risk that a non-Jewish majority will emerge between the Mediterranean and the Jordan River.