felines

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Felines

Formerly-issued Treasury securities whose coupons had been stripped by an intermediary. Felines therefore paid no interest. They were sold at a significant discount from par and matured at par. Felines fluctuated in price, sometimes dramatically, because changes in interest rates made them more or less desirable. There were a variety of different felines during the early 1980s, all with "feline" acronyms, such as CATS, COUGRS, and TIGRS. They became largely obsolete after 1986, when the U.S. Treasury began issuing its own stripped bonds. See also: zero-coupon bonds, STRIPS.

felines

See animals.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, all cats belong to the family felidae.
The tiger has been reconciled to the Felidae and can be distinguished from other big cats.
Kardela (1992), Kleparski (1996, 1997), Krzeszowski (1997), Lakoff and Johnson (1980), Lakoff (1987), Lakoff and Turner (1989), Langacker (1987), Martsa (2001), we will analyse those lexemes linked to the categories EQUIDAE, CANIDAE and FELIDAE which in their semantic history have undergone zoosemic development, targeted at the conceptual category FEMALE HUMAN BEING.
Pirincci's Felidae novels are very much in tune with societal changes in modern Germany, given that the protection of animals' dignity has been recently added to the Grundgesetz.
All expo attendees are invited to stop by the Canidae booths to receive free samples and coupons for the complete line of Canidae Pet Foods products including Canidae for dogs, Felidae for cats, Snap-Biscuit treats for dogs and TidNips treats for dogs and cats.
One such animal, Felidae, a three-year-old Storm Cat colt out of the multiple Graded-stakes winner Colcon was purchased for $900,000 (pounds 580,000) from the Lane's End draft at the 2001 Keeneland September Yearling Sale.
The carnivores of northwest Indiana that may be present in the Grand Calumet River basin are grouped in five families, the Canidae (coyote, two species of foxes, domestic dog), Procyonidae (raccoon), Mustelidae (two species of weasels, mink, badger), Mustelidae (skunk), and the Felidae (bobcat, housecat).
Phylogenetic reconstruction of the Felidae using 16S rRNA and NADH-5 mitochondrial genes.
This second display unit is made to display the company's Felidae line of canned natural cat food.
The families found to harbor the most risk zoonoses (excluding Hominidae because, by definition, they are capable of harboring all zoonotic diseases) were Muridae (Old World mice and rats, gerbils, whistling rats, and relatives), 21 risk zoonoses; Cricetidae (New World rats and mice, voles, hamsters, and relatives), 20; Canidae (coyotes, dogs, foxes, jackals, and wolves), 16; and Bovidae (antelopes, cattle, gazelles, goats, sheep, and relatives) and Felidae (cats), 15 each.
Order Family Taxon Primates Cercopithecidae Macuca fascicularis Pholidota Manidae Manis culionensis Carnivora Felidae Prionailurus bengalensis Mustelidae Amblonyx cinereus Mephitidae Mydaus marchei Herpestidae Herpestes brachyurus Viverridae Paradoxurus hermaphroditus Arctictis binturong Artiodactyla Cervidae Axis/Cervus spp.