Federalism

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Federalism

A political system in which the central government has certain, enumerated powers, and other government responsibilities are delegated to lower levels of government. For example, a federalist system may designate the central government to handle monetary policy and foreign affairs, but delegate most other matters to the provinces or states. Examples of federalist countries include the United States and Canada.
References in periodicals archive ?
exclusive" or "plenary" federal power over Indians.
The Federal Power Act exists to prevent this kind of discrimination and enforce contracts for energy delivery.
The Brazilian Federal power regulator has barred Eletronorte, Chesf and Furnas from participating in the auction for winning operating concessions as the Eletrobras subsidiaries violated a 180-day delay limit on earlier transmission works.
That agreement would concede that the left created the pretext for the new federal powers and that every federal initiative and program the left now opposes grew out of its lust for centralized power.
Federalist Paper number 11 describes the Commerce Clause not as a grant of federal power, but as a ``prohibitory regulation, extending .
We look forward to building on the momentum that led to this interim agreement, and, in the coming months, reaching a broad-based, long-term regional consensus for sharing the region's federal power benefits among all the region's households," added Markell.
Last week BPA announced the price of wholesale electricity from the Northwest's federal power generating system could rise by 150 percent or more this fall unless BPA customers reduce their energy demands on the agency by June 22.
Yet even as they complain about federal power, they have relied on it heavily, for functions ranging from building canals and highways to providing medical care for retirees.
The Pacific Northwest's seven shareholder-owned electric utilities, together serving 60 percent of the region's population, said they will fight to restore their customers' federal power benefits after being notified earlier today by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) that a recent federal court ruling is forcing suspension of those benefits.
Hamilton's words bring us back to the courts' proper role: active guardian of the Constitutional rights of citizens and the constitutional limitations on federal power, not active subverters of those limits or passive accomplices to the subversions of the other branches of government.
This claim, however, is contradicted both by the plain meaning of the Federal Power Act, the legislative history explaining the meaning and construction of the Act, and specific court findings that generators are in fact FERC jurisdictional, when they are used at wholesale in interstate sales.
Q: Is there an inherent tension in trying to decentralize federal power, as in Bush's education plan?

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