Featherbedding


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Related to Featherbedding: Secondary boycott

Featherbedding

1. Pejorative; a term for the hiring or maintaining the employment of more workers than a company needs, or of instituting unnecessary work procedures so that workers may have something to do without increasing the company's production. Historically, this has applied to union contracts in which a union insists the employer hire more union members than he/she needs. However, the term is also used to describe unnecessary or nepotistic management level positions.

2. Under the Taft-Hartley Act, an illegal agreement providing for payment for services that are unperformed and not to be performed. This was passed as an anti-union measure limiting the ability to create "make-work" programs, but the U.S. Supreme Court ruled such programs to be legal in American Newspaper Publishers Association vs. National Labor Relations Board (1953). This decision defined featherbedding exclusively as paying a worker not to work.
References in periodicals archive ?
There's no question the operating engineers have more featherbedding positions than any other New York City construction union in the city,' says James McNamara, a construction expert in the city's office of employment.
Just as featherbedding increases the cost of construction, the shakedown has been factored into the price of doing business.
What he did was make sure we would continue a system of featherbedding.
So attached have our diplomats become to this foreign office featherbedding that, while the State Department insists on spending $4.
Rather than limit government, the GOP's featherbedding leaders and backbenchers alike have hiked their own pay and the budget of nearly every federal agency.
The comptroller general found that hundreds of retired and "pre-retired' individuals on INP's payroll were earning $3,000 to $6,000 per month, and called this "one of the most blatant examples of featherbedding in Venezuela.
Businessmen and government officialssquandering government-financed loans, state agencies awash in red ink, widespread graft, featherbedding, pension scandals--the last decade in Venezuela could have been an investigative journalist's dream.
They turned down special-interest propositions pushed by trial lawyers, two health-care measures that would have increased costs and encouraged featherbedding, and a retroactive increase in top-bracket income tax rates that would have hurt start-up businesses that create new jobs.