Christ the King

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Christ the King

In Catholic theology, the idea that Jesus Christ is the ultimate source of law and that therefore human law should attempt to conform to divine law. This does not extend only to religious matters, but also to social and economic ones. For example, the notion of Christ the King has been used to defend the right to private property, the right of workers to unionize, and the obligation to follow secular law. For that reason, it has been used to criticize both capitalism and communism in the context of Catholic teaching on social justice.
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At the Feast of Christ the King, Archbishop Mennini will celebrate and preach at the 11am Mass at the cathedral.
We go all out on the Feast of Christ the King to name and proclaim that there are no temporal authorities--religious, political, economic, or otherwise--that own us.
The original feast of Christ the King was started to celebrate the "allembracing authority of Christ which shall lead mankind to seek the 'peace of Christ' in the 'Kingdom of Christ'.
The season of Pentecost, according to many liturgical traditions, stretches from Pentecost Sunday--50 days after Easter--all the way to the Feast of Christ the King, which marks the end of the church year.
His visit is at the invitation of the Archbishop of Liverpool, and is timed to coincide with the Feast of Christ the King, the Patronal Feast of the Metropolitan Cathedral, on Sunday.
The answer shows us what the feast of Christ the King means.
Reflecting on the feast of Christ the King today, when Christ came to the world, he inaugurated this kingdom characterized by "justice, love, and peace" (Preface of the Mass of Christ the King).
Matthew later sums up Jesus' teachings (which is the Gospel reading for the upcoming feast of Christ the King observed on the last Sunday of this liturgical cycle).
Today's Feast of Christ the King is the end of the liturgical year.
But all good things must end, which Ordinary Time does in November with the Feast of Christ the King, followed, I would imagine, by the Second Helping of Dessert for the King, which consists mainly of snickerdoodles, a cinnamon sugar cookie that, it turns out, you can eat 37 of before you realize what a bad idea it was.
Sunday eucharist for the Feast of Christ the King was led by the Rev Geoff Bamford.
The feast of Christ the King is precisely the reason why, for the Catholic, religion and politics are not and never will be separate.