Fear Appeal

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Fear Appeal

In marketing, the use of fear to generate the desired response. For example, a company may launch an advertising campaign implying that persons who do not purchase flood insurance are in imminent danger of a flood. Fear appeal is most common in marketing related to health care.
References in periodicals archive ?
So often, victims and their families are forgotten and they must fear appeals even with Rex, who spoke about the accused and the suffering of their families.
Following the insights gleaned from this preliminary study, we then provide a review of the fear appeals literature (focusing on MS), which guides our research exploration in the second study.
Along with updated content, this edition has 17 new chapters, including those on fear appeals, narrative persuasion, and health campaigns.
Smokers are less likely to be influenced or to change their attitudes once they become accustomed to high fear appeals.
In particular, fear appeals have been used to discourage various behaviors including drug use, drinking and driving, unsafe sexual practices, and unsafe/distracted driving.
It also highlights the need for strategies to boost the cognitive and behavioural elements of climate change engagement without resorting to methods such as fear appeals that are, at best, a double edged sword.
Messages that combine strong fear appeals with low levels of self-efficacy are most ineffective in that they prompt psychological defensive responses such as avoidance or reactance.
Thus, the main aim of this review is to examine the role that fear appeals have played in improving driver safety; and, more specifically, the use (and effectiveness) of threat appeals in road safety advertising campaigns.
Analyzing advertising with the same coding scheme used for those from previous presidential elections allows Kaid to show that advertising in 2004 was more negative and that Bush used more fear appeals (than Kerry in 2004 or Bush in 2000).
Protection motivation and self efficacy: a revised theory of fear appeals and attitude change.
Thus, while the overall incidence is low, readers of any specific issue could find a relatively high incidence of fear appeals in the food ads they see.
Chapter topics include the use of fear appeals, intrusive advertising in daily lives, the American materialistic culture, body image advertising, and puffery and deceptive advertising practice.