Henri Fayol

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Henri Fayol

A French mining company manager who devised one of the first systematic management systems. Fayol asserted that management had six goals: forecasting, planning, organizing, commanding, coordinating and controlling. He argued that employees must be expected to follow rules, but managers must compensate them appropriately and treat them fairly. According to Fayol, both employees and employers must subordinate their individual goals to those of the whole company. He lived from 1841 to 1925.
References in periodicals archive ?
Incongruous as it may sound, the principles being referred to are Henri Fayol's principles of management (see sidebar).
Indeed, evident in the prodigious literary output which marks the findings of those management researchers who compare Japanese and American management styles is the revelation that the Japanese are astute practitioners of Fayol's principles.
In those few texts where the principles were given more than a cursory listing, the explanations and definitions that accompanied them were frequently so generalized and distorted that they barely represented the essence which Fayol's principles attempted to convey.
The purging of Fayol's principles from the mainstream of management thought here in the United States is a rather peculiar phenomenon, especially when it is considered that the discipline of management grew and evolved from the precepts of the principles; that the functions of management were established by the principles (i.