Faux Pas


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Faux Pas

A social mistake. An example is belching loudly at a cocktail hour. An excessively embarrassing or insulting faux pas can make business difficult or impossible to conduct.
References in periodicals archive ?
The top 10 flying faux pas include being rude to crew/ staff, parents failing to discipline their children, someone that crowds your seat and/or hogs the "extra" middle seat, travelers talking loudly on the plane, people blocking the baggage claim area for others, those that recline their seat into your seating area, people that bring stinky food on the plane, travelers that hog the carry-on bin, people that rush off the plane versus waiting for passengers in front to exit and people who block the aisles during a flight.
Faux pas was the most common trigger of embarrassment in our sample (70.
Swindon, by Kingmambo out of an Irish Oaks winner, is a fascinating newcomer on pedigree and is in receipt of a handy weight allowance, but she will need to be quite useful to overcome inexperience and preference is for Major Faux Pas, who sets the standard.
Samples of Vice's priceless commentaries that skewer the fashion-challenged: The woman in the for is dubbed the "mind-blowingly hot" mistress of a dead Italian, while the young man is presumed a French Canadian whose "huge women's earrings" are a faux pas surpassed only by his mom's "biker shorts,"
After be told his wife about the faux pas, however, she persuaded him to report the loss to the Flathead County Sheriff's Office.
Carlos has built her theme on a foundation of national stereotypes and behavioral cliches, most of which more or less hold until she characterizes Australia as the "only true southern continent"--something of a faux pas in a colonized country anxious to get out from (down) under its peripheral relation to Europe and America.
The first edition of publisher Gregg Ogden and editor Marl See's monthly Celebrate Northwest Arkansas has hit the streets--with a faux pas on the cover.
It's always the other fellows who don't read the land right, or who make the faux pas, or who have some skeleton in their closets, or who don't realize they've lashed themselves to some position that's going to anchor them in the political deep.
Simply an attempt to revisit an advertising firm's faux pas.
Richard Lederer has fashioned an enviable career--to the tune of some 2000 books and articles, if the cover blurb is to be believed--out of collecting puns, typographical errors, mangled metaphors, accidental double entendres, and other linguistic faux pas that are guaranteed to induce giggles in those of us inclined, whether by nature or nurture, to find such philological shenanigans giggle-inducing.
Quebec's Archbishop Blanchet made a second faux pas in the semantic word game about not approving but not opposing adoption by homosexuals.
and arranged George Gershwin's "Summertime" for Reginald Ray-Savage's premiere Faux Pas, a dance that rhythmically revamped classical ballet.