substitute

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Substitute

A good or service that satisfies a consumer's needs or desires just as well or almost as well as a similar good or service. A common type of substitute is an off-brand product; for example, a grocery store may sell its own peanut butter to compete with the on-brand peanut butter it also sells. Often, though not always, the price of a substitute is lower than that of the original product, but they follow generally the same trends. For example, if demand for the on-brand peanut butter rises, its price increases, but so does the price of the off-brand peanut butter, because consumers are willing to pay more for peanut butter generally, but are still looking for a bargain.

substitute

See swap.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eating food which is naturally low in fat and calories may be a better route than relying on fat substitutes or artificial sweeteners.
introduced Avicel, a fat substitute consisting of a cellulose gel, in the mid 1960s, and National Starch and Chemical came out with a tapioca dextrin a decade later.
The study by researchers at Purdue University showed that synthetic fat substitutes used in low-calorie potato chips and other foods could backfire and contribute to weight gain and obesity.
Vociferous opponent of the fat substitute, the Center for Science in the Public Interest, has called previous Procter & Gamble studies on olestra "misleading junk science that appears to have been carefully designed not to find a problem.
Joining the list of fat substitutes containing such carbohydrates as maltodextrin and polydextrose is an interesting newcomer developed by the U.
At the top of the new ingredient list is NutraSweet itself, a division of Monsanto, which has developed Simplesse, an all-natural fat substitute made of egg and milk proteins.
Be aware some contain olestra (Olean), a calorie-free fat substitute that in large amounts can cause loose stools.
It has an excellent mouthfeel and could have applications as a fat substitute.
A fat substitute used in popular snack foods was rejected by a Canadian food regulatory agency, making the United States the only country to approve olestra as a food ingredient.
The dietary fat substitute Olestra registers false-positive results on conventional assays for fecal fat excretion, the results of a Baylor University study determined.