Fascism

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Fascism

A political system characterized by extreme nationalism. When it emerged in the early 20th century, it rejected both left-wing and right-wing thought and advocated a system in which the citizens of a nation work together for a common goal (usually under the command of a strong leader). Fascism is noted for corporatist economic policies, in which interests of the state, businesses and workers cooperate to set policies. It is strongly associated with racism and/or expansionism.
References in periodicals archive ?
They developed links with the Fascist regime to make money," says Nigel.
12) that characterized the first decade of the fascist regime.
The vote in Spain's lower house formally denounces Franco's fascist regime, allows local governments to fund efforts to unearth mass graves from the 1936-1939 Civil War, orders the removal of all Franco-era symbols from streets and buildings, and declares "illegitimate" summary military trials that led to the execution or imprisonment of thousands of the general's enemies.
The brooding and bloody fable is set during the reign of the fascist regime in Forties Spain.
She stood in northern Iraq and watched as Saddam Hussein's fascist regime bombed Kurd villages and was sacked from Labour's Shadow Cabinet when she spoke out.
We are in the greatest danger since the Battle of Britain in 1940, when our very survival as a nation was achieved by the exploits of a few hundred fighter pilots to deter the fascist regime of Hitler, from the subjugation of our people.
Most came from the politically active regions of South Wales to fight the fascist regime which had overthrown a democratically elected republican government.
His father fled Franco's fascist regime in search of asylum during the Spanish Civil War.
Despite what she described as 'fascist methods employed by this fascist regime,' De Lima said she would continue to fight her battle and 'wage our own war for human rights and democracy.
As the author so clearly shows, rather than being concerned with individual works, the Fascist regime perceived the large numbers of foreign books being published as an invasion of the national market.
of Sheffield in the UK, presents a thorough account of the complex political scene in 1930s Spain, showing how the Juventud de Accion, a galvanized, coherent, and determinedly nationalist movement, was of critical importance in the development of the fascist regime of Franco.