Farthing

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Related to Farthings: brass farthing

Farthing

A former coin in the United Kingdom equal in value to one quarter of one penny. Farthings were used in the United Kingdom prior to the decimalization of the British pound. They ceased to be legal tender in 1960.
References in classic literature ?
He thrust his hand into his pouch, but not a scrap nor a farthing was there.
Take care of your farthings, old Tinker, and your guineas will come quite nat'ral.
Tinker, surlily; "because he looks to his farthings.
Fortunately for me, my father lost a lawsuit just in the nick of time, and was obliged to scrape together every farthing of available money that he possessed to pay for the luxury of going to law.
He had met with serious difficulties, and had spent the last farthing of Moody's money in attempting to overcome them.
Every farthing he has in the world," said my mother, "is to be thrown into that hateful speculation.
At least he thought he had done so, but when he turned over his change he found the new farthing still there and a sovereign gone.
This done, there were actually left, between that time and Christmas, liabilities to be met to the extent of forty thousand pounds, without a farthing in hand to pay that formidable debt.
It was to save them from absolute destruction I parted with your dear present, notwithstanding all the value I had for it: I sold the horse for them, and they have every farthing of the money.
He was struggling for every farthing of his share (and he could not help it, for he had only to relax his efforts, and he would not have had the money to pay his laborers' wages), while they were only struggling to be able to do their work easily and agreeably, that is to say, as they were used to doing it.
That the twenty thousand pounds (from which the income was supposed to be derived) had every farthing of it been sold out of the Funds, at different periods, ending with the end of the year eighteen hundred and forty-seven.
That is to say, not one farthing of the twenty thousand pounds was to go to Miss Halcombe, or to any other relative or friend of Lady Glyde's.