Fraudulent Conveyance

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Fraudulent Conveyance

The transfer of property to another party in order to defraud a creditor. For example, if a person owes the bank for a loan for $15,000, the person may give or sell $15,000 worth of property to a relative, often while still maintaining use of the property, in order to prevent the bank from being repaid. Legally, fraudulent conveyance requires the intention to defraud a creditor.
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Religious affiliation mediated the impact of deviant peers and negative school environment on positive family relationships.
If more family camps were to intentionally teach principles to families, or base their programming on fundamental family leisure principles, they may be much more effective in actually strengthening family relationships and improving family functioning.
We need to harness this alliance to achieve a new era of true equality, one which sees family relationships and the care and nurturing that accompanies these as positive, and something deserving of public support.
Content will include information on such topics as parent-child relationships, stepfamilies, family structures, child development, extended family relationships, communication styles, rules and boundaries, adoption, marriage, work, disclosure and gender roles.
However, as documentaries often do, Hardwood evolved, becoming a film much more about family relationships.
The Language Of Parenting: Building Great Family Relationships At All Ages is a guide designed to help parents better understand and apply proven communication techniques to aid their children's growth, learning, and development.
with] an ambition and fiery determination that burned so hot that friendships were shattered, family relationships destroyed, and hearts broken.
The steady increase in the number of older people will have a direct bearing on family relationships and solidarity, generational equity and lifestyles.
While it has become usual to construe literacy broadly and consider evidence of book ownership and patronage in discussions of women and literacy, Rebecca Krug's analysis of women's literate practices opens up new understanding of ways family relationships shaped women's responses to the challenges of an increasingly text-based society in fifteenth-century England.
American families who are "religiously involved" have stronger family relationships than those who aren't, according to the new study.
Teens who are members of religiously involved families are likely to have stronger family relationships than teens in families that are not religiously active, according to a report from the National Study of Youth and Religion, a four-year research project based at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Bush has decided that federal tax dollars should be used to promote strong marriages and family relationships.
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