Department for Work and Pensions

(redirected from Family Resources Survey)
Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

Department for Work and Pensions

A department of the British government responsible for administration of welfare policy, British Social Security, state pensions, and similar matters. Because it handles most government payments to citizens, it oversees the largest budget of any department in the U.K. It was established in 2001, but traces its origins to the beginnings of the welfare state in the early 20th century.

Department for Work and Pensions (DWP)

the UK government department and its offices (the Benefit Agency Employment Service and Jobcentre Plus) responsible for administering the government's social welfare and employment programmes. The former includes making payments in respect of old-age PENSIONS, disabilities pensions, child allowance and the JOBSEEKERS ALLOWANCE (formerly unemployment benefit). Regarding the latter a particular concern has been to instill in people a culture of ‘employment’ being the norm, playing down the negative aspects of ‘unemployment’. This more positive approach is reflected in the work of the DWP's agency, the Employment Service and its nationwide network of ‘JOB CENTRES’, the introduction of the jobseekers allowance as a replacement for unemployment benefit and the NEW DEAL programme aimed at reducing youth unemployment and long-term unemployment amongst older workers.

The DWP is also responsible for conducting the fact-finding LABOUR FORCE SURVEY which provides data on conditions in the labour market; for overseeing the application of the UK's EMPLOYMENT LAWS; and for implementing employee rights' regulations issued by the European Union (see, for example, the WORKING TIME REGULATION).

Department for Work and Pensions (DWP)

the UK government department responsible for administering the government's employment and social security programmes. The DWP was formed in 2001 from parts of the former Department of Social Security and Department for Education and Employment and the Employment Service.

The department assists UNEMPLOYED people of working age into employment, helps employers to fill VACANCIES and provides financial support to persons unable to help themselves through ‘back-to-work’ programmes.

The DWP also administers the SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS system, paying state pensions, sickness benefit, child support and the JOBSEEKERS ALLOWANCE.

In 2002 the former Benefits Agency and the Employment Service were replaced by the JOBCENTRE PLUS network (responsible for helping people to find jobs and paying benefits to people of working age) and the Pension Service (responsible for paying state pensions).

Regarding employment, a particular concern of the Department is to instil in people a culture of employment as being the norm but at the same time playing down the negative aspects of unemployment. This more positive approach is reflected in the work of the DWP's agency Jobcentre Plus and its nationwide network of JOB CENTRES, the introduction of the jobseekers allowance as a replacement for unemployment benefit and the NEW DEA? programme aimed at reducing youth unemployment and long-term unemployment amongst older workers.

The DWP is also responsible for conducting the fact-finding LABOUR FORCE SURVEY, which provides data on conditions in the labour market, for overseeing the application of the UK's EMPLOYMENT LAWS, and for implementing employee rights’ regulations issued by the European Union (see, for example, the WORKING TIME REGULATION).

References in periodicals archive ?
Family Resources Survey (2013) Department for Work and Pensions *2007 funeral cost: Mintel - UK - January 2007.
To report UK prevalence rates for childhood disability and social and household circumstances of disabled children, comparing these to those of non-disabled children where appropriate, researchers studied data from the 2004 to 2005 national Family Resources Survey (FRS) estimates of children defined as disabled according to the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA).
Meanwhile, separate statistics from the Family Resources Survey showed that the number of pensioners living in households with less than 40% of the national average income rose from 450,000 to 460,000 in 2005/06.
The first was the Family Resources Survey from 1997/ 98.
The Government's Family Resources Survey shows that in 2002 there were 880,000 people earning pounds 5000 a year or less.
The Family Resources Survey is compiled by National Statistics using a sample of more than 25,000 households.
According to National Statistics' Family Resources Survey 2004/2005, almost two-thirds of single parents have no savings at all; earnings are taken up by the high living costs of being alone and bringing up children.
The study, which is based on the Government's annual Family Resources Survey, revealed that 14% of North East children are classed as being in severe poverty - slightly higher than the national average of 13%.
The disparity was one of the key findings of a report on incomes derived from the Family Resources Survey.
Full browser ?