fair market value

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Fair Market Value

A subjective estimate of what a willing buyer would pay a willing seller for a given asset, assuming both have a reasonable knowledge of the asset's worth. Fair market value is important in both law and accounting. In the former, it is often used in assessing damages as the result of a lawsuit. In the latter, determining the fair market value of an asset (e.g. after depreciation) is important to determining the amount of tax owed on it.

fair market value

The price at which a buyer and a seller willingly consummate a trade.

Fair market value.

Fair market value is the price you would have to pay to buy a particular asset or service on the open market.

The concept of fair market value assumes that both buyer and seller are reasonably well informed of market conditions. It also assumes that neither is under undue pressure to buy or sell, and that neither intends to defraud the other.

fair market value

The amount that a willing buyer would pay a willing seller for property after reasonable exposure to the marketplace.

Fair Market Value (FMV)

The amount at which property would change hands between a willing buyer and a willing seller, neither being under compulsion to buy or sell and both having reasonable knowledge of the relevant facts.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, assume that a shareholder organizes a corporation and contributes as its only asset a building with a basis of $50 and a fair market value of $100; the property is subject to a mortgage debt of $90.
taxpayer engaged in the real estate business owns two properties, Blackacre and Whiteacre, each of which has a fair market value of $1 million and an adjusted basis of $100,000.
If each property is subsequently sold for its fair market value of $1 million, each corporation incurs a loss of $1 million.
When the mortgagor is insolvent and personally liable, the outstanding debt is treated as an amount realized to the same extent it is when the mortgagor is solvent--that is, to the extent of the property's fair market value.
If the outstanding debt exceeds the property's fair market value, the excess is treated as debt forgiveness income.
However, if at any time the property's adjusted basis exceeds its fair market value and the mortgagee can establish any portion of the excess will not be collected from the mortgagor, the excess can be treated as a worthless debt under section 166 and the property's basis reduced accordingly.
The internal Revenue Service defines fair market value as "the price at which property would change hands between a willing buyer and a willing seller, neither being under any compulsion to buy or sell, and both having reasonable knowledge of relative facts.
The term, fair market value (FMV) assumes the business to be on-going and offered for sale in the marketplace for a reasonable period of time.
Similarly, a sofa could have a fair market value between $45 and $253, according to the ItsDeductible database.
The IRS allows you to deduct the actual fair market value for donated items.
Strong Numbers, the Blue Book for Everything, is a revolutionary product and price reference guide that provides the fair market value for a wide variety of products from computers and electronics to collectibles.
It is this company policy that attracts international buyers, seeking quality equipment at fair market values.