Fair Labor Standards Act

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Fair Labor Standards Act

Also called the FLSA. Legislation in the United States, passed in 1938, that required employers engaged in interstate commerce to provide a minimum level of employee benefits. For example, the FLSA prohibits child labor and established the first federal minimum wage. For purposes of this Act, "interstate commerce" is interpreted so broadly as to include basically all employers not specifically exempted. It was part of the New Deal.
References in periodicals archive ?
What follows is a basic summary of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, Workmen's Compensation, the Occupational Health and Safety Act, and a general overview of zoning issues and labor law.
2 Rep Miller, George [CA-7] "Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2007" To amend the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 to provide for an increase in the Federal minimum wage.
The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, administered by the Department of Labor gave workers an eight-hour day and abolished child labor.
Louis, charges Allstate with violations of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 and the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 for instituting a moratorium on hiring back former employee-agents, more than 90% of whom reportedly were over the age of 40.
Answer: Most employers in Oregon have "dual coverage," meaning that they are covered under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, or FLSA, as well as the Oregon wage collection laws in ORS Chapter 652 and the Oregon minimum wage laws in ORS Chapter 653.
Department of Labor (IDOL) issued as final regulations governing federal overtime pay requirements under the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA).
In fact, a youth minimum wage, authorized by 1996 amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, allows employers to pay workers who are under age 20 a lower wage for 90 calendar days.
These include Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the equal pay requirement under the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, and the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993.
It's time to raise the minimum wage for working families, Historically, the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 established a federal minimum wage and overtime requirements for covered American workers.
Historical events show that oppositions within the labor movement had prolonged passage of legislation relating to minimum wages and maximum hours, contained in the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938