facade

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facade

The front of a building; what one sees from the street. Sometimes a building is constructed of metal, but the facade is brick or some other attractive treatment. Zoning regulations, subdivision restrictions,and historic district requirements may specify particular building facades.

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Furthermore, the share of Building Integrated Photovoltaics for roofs and facades, one of the specialisations of Emirates Insolaire, is witnessing the quickest growth.
What we have in the region now is a unique and extremely strong, well-equipped industrial background, which makes possible the fast-track construction of large and complex building facades," she says.
In the Bay Area, he will focus on high performance buildings, expanding on his background of structural glass facades, materials consulting and integrated building envelope design.
Western Facades is the first restoration group dedicated exclusively to these complex assignments.
8220;Far from being purely aesthetic, facades are increasingly used to support sustainable, energy-efficient design and improve worker productivity by regulating the entire building environment,” said Ettouney.
On the facades of the latest buildings, a different concept was used to create abstract frescos.
India's facade industry has seen some iconic structures being built including the International Convention Centre in Pune, the soon-to-be-opened Park Hyatt Hyderabad and the stunning structure of Mukesh Ambani's billion-dollar residence.
Etymology, however, not only exposes the semantic kinship of face and facade, but also reveals their less obvious features: namely their facticity and activeness.
But if you are going to complete buildings with sustainable performances, you need to understand and appreciate the environmental performances of a building's facade in advance, before you design, construct and erect and thereafter go through a series of verification exercises which check the "as built" performance.
The reader does not get the sense of long hours watching facades in changing light, of visits to quarries, or of concern with color or materials.
A stimulating discussion on the nature of the facade, at the Royal Academy in London, prompted the thought that the phrase 'skin deep' may be taking on a non-pejorative meaning.
These facades generally have the vulnerabilities of sacrificial lambs, but they do not provide such a rich set of data.