Fair Labor Standards Act

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Fair Labor Standards Act

Also called the FLSA. Legislation in the United States, passed in 1938, that required employers engaged in interstate commerce to provide a minimum level of employee benefits. For example, the FLSA prohibits child labor and established the first federal minimum wage. For purposes of this Act, "interstate commerce" is interpreted so broadly as to include basically all employers not specifically exempted. It was part of the New Deal.
References in periodicals archive ?
The FLSA itself makes no mention of a salary basis test.
An inside sales person in a wholesale distribution firm must be paid time and one-half for hours worked over 40 per week; but a salesperson in a retail establishment who performs the same duties would not have to be paid overtime, so long as certain wage and commission criteria specified in the FLSA are met.
A cause of action under the FLSA supersedes all other criminal statutes.
If an employment relationship is determined to exist, participating businesses can be held responsible for full compliance with FLSA, including the child labor provisions.
There are certainly pitfalls in this area of advancing technology as it relates to the FLSA.
Furthermore, the MCA exemption from the FLSA was not restricted to individuals employed as drivers in interstate commerce.
The FLSA Guide Package will be available for purchase on November 16.
The FLSA states joint employment exists where workers have an employment relationship with one employer such as a staffing agency, and the economic realities show that they are economically dependent on and thus employed by another entity involved in the work.
PPWO was formed in 2014 in response to President Barack Obama's directive to the Department of Labor to "update and modernize" FLSA overtime regulations.
However, the question of what actually constitutes compensable "working time" under the FLSA can be confusing.
Employers have recently faced a massive number of FLSA lawsuits for overtime compensation and minimum wage violations.
Despite the increased workload and longer hours, GEICO refuses to pay TCRs/TAs the overtime wages which KOL believes GEICO is required to do under the FLSA.