Extrinsic Value

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Extrinsic Value

The value of an asset that occurs by mutual agreement. Fiat money, for example, has value because everyone in an economy agrees that it has value, even though the paper on which it is printed does not have any more value than other paper. The line between extrinsic and intrinsic value is sometimes blurry.
References in periodicals archive ?
Promotion of public awareness and capacity building for proper appreciation of the environmental significance and socioeconomic values of wildlife and conservation of biological diversity and realization of its intrinsic and extrinsic values through sustainable use and community participation are also among the objectives of the bill.
People's unity, public and spiritual consent, political stability as foundations of the constitutional system develop extrinsic values of our society.
Studies show that those who prize intrinsic values, such as meaningful work, experience greater happiness than those who esteem extrinsic values like wealth, even when the differences in wealth are large.
Students with an immigration background reported more extrinsic values than did students of Swiss nationality.
They found some significant positive correlations for intrinsic values and negative correlations for extrinsic values to career maturity but reported no strong relationship between the two.
In a speech to the National Association of Schools of Music, President Daniel Sher spoke about the intrinsic and extrinsic values of music.
In capitalistic, consumerist cultures, such as the United States, however, the pursuit of extrinsic values such as external rewards and the praise of others are encouraged.
Extrinsic values of an environment exist because some of its attributes satisfy human needs, whereas those that have intrinsic value exist without being useful to humans.
Additional analyses found men more likely to espouse extrinsic values, women more likely to espouse social values, and students from median parental-income groups more likely to espouse intrinsic values.
Intrinsic values refer to an importance placed on autonomy and interest; social values refer to an importance placed on working with people and making contributions to society; extrinsic values refer to an importance placed on making money and having job security; and finally, prestige values refer to an importance placed on having a prestigious and respected occupation (Elizur, 1984; Ros et al.
In light of this previous research, we hypothesized that there would be significant gender differences and racial differences in work values, with men and Black students more likely to espouse extrinsic values, and women and White students more likely to espouse social values.