Variable

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Related to Extraneous variable: Intervening variable, Moderator variable, research hypothesis, Research design

Variable

An element in a model. For example, in the model RS&Pt+1 = a + b Tbill t + et, where RS&Pt+1 is the return on the S&P in month t+1 and Tbill is the Tbill return at month t, both RS&P and Tbill are "variables" because they change through time; i.e., they are not constant.

Variable

Anything that does not have a set value. In basic algebra, a variable is often expressed as "x." Variables in economics and finance may be measures such as GDP, prices, or interest rates. Analysts use complicated equations to determine the value of some variables at the present time and even more complicated equations to predict their possible future values. See also: Regression.

variable

Something, such as stock prices, earnings, dividend payments, interest rates, and gross domestic product, that has no fixed quantitative value. See also dependent variable, independent variable.
References in periodicals archive ?
By using a classroom setting, the study has more control of the variance of the experiment and avoids extraneous variables.
Alo and Cancado write that defining motivation by exclusion--that is, by factors that are outside the operant contingency--is problematic for two reasons: first, because of the unaccounted effects of extraneous variables and second, because variables that are not part of the n-term contingency that affect responding may not necessarily be motivational.
In particular, factors such as the ability to restructure job tasks and share essential functions, the clarity of definitions regarding acceptable work performance, and the extent that work roles are determined by extraneous variables (i.
The basic logic underlying single subject research is that the experimenter controls for extraneous variables by comparing the individual's performance under intervention to the performance on the baseline (McReynolds & Thompson, 1986).
The differences in scores between the groups can be attributed to the effects of the extraneous variables and not because of curriculum choice.
They concentrate on between-subjects and within-subjects designs, the identification and control of extraneous variables, ANOVA, and the interpretation of results.