Actual Authority

(redirected from Express Authority)
Also found in: Legal.

Actual Authority

The legal authority a person has as the result of a law or contract. For example, the owner of a house has the actual authority to sell it because the law states that he is the owner. Likewise, the president of the United States has the actual authority to sign or veto legislation. Persons with actual authority are legally liable for their actions. Actual authority is distinct from apparent authority. It is also called express authority.
References in classic literature ?
cried he, with an air of awkward gallantry; "and I am persuaded that when sanctioned by the express authority of both your excellent parents, my proposals will not fail of being acceptable.
shall not work on Saturdays, Sundays, Holidays or other hours, without express authority
To the extent that the federal government is threatening potential buyers based on old laws that contradict the Constitution, the federal government is establishing the weakness of its authority and affirming the lack of express authority under the Constitution.
Though others may, perhaps, lawfully have published them they could not do so under his express authority.
A contract may be written or oral and may be based on express authority or apparent/implied authority.
Second, the FCC granted two enforcement complaints filed against a video provider carrying two broadcast stations without the stations' express authority.
It further instructed the Department of Defense to institute regulations prohibiting military personnel from engaging in law enforcement activities without the express authority of the Constitution or Congress.
Litigators in the United States might be disappointed to learn that like the rest of the world, very little discovery is generally permitted absent express authority in the arbitration clause.
To date, Congress has not given the FCC express authority to
Although the Securities & Exchange Commission has express authority to enforce securities laws against aiders and abettors, the Supreme Court has held that securities laws do not create an implied private cause of action for aiding and abetting.
But in July, the Dodd-Frank Act gave the SEC express authority to adopt proxy access rules.
These signs were erected under the express authority of a federal judgment and permanent injunction.