Explicit tax

Explicit tax

A tax specifically collected by a government; includes income, withholding, property, sales, and value-added taxes and tariffs.

Explicit Tax

A tax levied and collected by a government. Examples include income tax, value added tax, sales tax, estate tax, and so forth. This compares to hidden regulatory fees, which add to the cost of doing business without necessarily adding to government revenue. For example, some argue for a carbon tax that would, theoretically, increase government revenue by taxing the emission of carbon dioxide. This compares to a proposed cap-and-trade system, which requires carbon emitters to buy permission to emit without changing how they are actually taxed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Where the federal tax law provides explicit tax elections (e.
That is in addition to explicit tax hikes on income, capital gains, and dividends, the implicit ones on energy via cap-and-trade, and so forth.
The cost to taxpayers of an explicit tax extends far beyond the dollars remitted to the taxing authority.
It happens that the R&D account gets explicit tax treatment, so it's easier there to sketch the adverse consequence of neglect of asset stewardship.
j] is the MTR from the explicit tax on labor income.
Criminal records provide a counter-chronicle for Cohn, but their mixed reports of robbery, murder, and collective mayhem muddle the inrentionality of these events as explicit tax revolts.
It could be offset with an explicit tax on wheat consumption or subsidy on cocoa consumption.
First, explicit tax is the sum of all direct and indirect taxes.
More importantly for ratemaking purposes, the explicit tax liability had reached about two percent of premiums in 1991.
In a Scholes and Wolfson |10~ framework, investors would respond to the increased explicit tax on preferred stock by demanding a higher pre-tax dividend yield, in order to restore the previous risk-adjusted, after-tax return spread between auction rate preferred and fully taxable securities.
10) These focal points occur every place the tax law provides an explicit tax election (11) that directly affects the tax treatment of multiple taxpayers.
The "revenue neutral" package is analyzed as simply summing to a net zero impact and is accepted by the floor as a unit, rather than having its constituent parts examined with the care that would be devoted to debating a package of explicit spending proposals offset by explicit tax increases.