Explicit tax

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Explicit tax

A tax specifically collected by a government; includes income, withholding, property, sales, and value-added taxes and tariffs.

Explicit Tax

A tax levied and collected by a government. Examples include income tax, value added tax, sales tax, estate tax, and so forth. This compares to hidden regulatory fees, which add to the cost of doing business without necessarily adding to government revenue. For example, some argue for a carbon tax that would, theoretically, increase government revenue by taxing the emission of carbon dioxide. This compares to a proposed cap-and-trade system, which requires carbon emitters to buy permission to emit without changing how they are actually taxed.
References in periodicals archive ?
If a single woman leaves welfare to take a job, the combination of explicit taxes and lost benefits will yield marginal tax rates approaching 80 percent--an affront to those serious about working their way to a better life.
There are no explicit taxes, so these are also nominal prices paid by consumers.
Taxpayers taxable at different rates will pay explicit taxes at different amounts and rates.
In this simple example, each taxpayer decides whether to hold municipal bonds or corporate bonds by trading off implicit and explicit taxes.
Those prices are before explicit taxes, but they are after implicit taxes.
One of the points emphasized by Myron Scholes, Mark Wolfson, and their co-authors in their tax planning textbook, Taxes and Business Strategy, is that implicit taxes are real taxes, just as are explicit taxes.
Thus, the amount paid by Compaq before all taxes (including implicit and explicit taxes, whether positive or negative) for its Shell stock was $890.
74) The key to clientele-based arbitrage is the trade-off between implicit and explicit taxes.
They are trading off implicit and explicit taxes in whatever way advantages them.
If the proper way to think about pre-tax profit is before both implicit and explicit taxes, then how did the parties, the courts, and the commentators all miss that argument?
In contrast with the government's position, the argument that courts should calculate before-tax profit before implicit taxes as well as before explicit taxes does not depend upon formalities.