Expense Account


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Expense Account

An account a company keeps with a budgeted amount of money in it to allow an employee to pay expenses on a business trip. For example, a company may authorize an employee to use a company credit card to pay for hotel, food and similar expenses while she attends a marketing event. Less commonly, an expense account refers to a situation in which an employee spends his/her own money and receives a reimbursement from the employer.
References in periodicals archive ?
In its recent Advisory Opinion 2013-03A, the DOL provided guidance as to the fiduciary review needed to set up such an ERISA expense account.
The paper asked PASYDY head Glafcos Hadjipetrou about calculating the expense account into the pension, who noted that the overtime hours of civil servants, for example, were not included when calculating their pension benefits.
Harris said there was $230,000 in the general expense account, and $5,000 in the capital outlay account.
Moreover, if a standard costing system is used, an over/under absorbed expense account is used to record variances that are not allocated to inventory.
The largest administrative category in USAID's operating expense account is salaries and related support for U.
Note: the screen actually asks for an expense account, but I believe that if the Item is being used to track a lob/project related cost it should go to a Cost of Goods Sold type of account, not an expense.
Employees can benefit significantly by using a commuter expense account, especially in today's tight economy," said Jeff Fritz, chief executive officer and president of Lighthouse1.
I WAS in the privileged position of working for a major US company with an expense account.
ONCE again our politicians lead by example and are shown to be nothing more than self-seeking money-grabbers whose main motivation is to maximise their expense account taken from our taxes.
Although no figure was revealed at the meeting, voters agreed to transfer the balance in the fiscal 2007 tax title expense account to the fiscal 2008 tax title expense account.
Aside from his staggering six-figure salary, just look at Brewer's other perks: A $45,000 annual expense account.
Since 1949, Presidents have also received a non-taxable $50,000 expense account.