Expected dividend yield

Expected dividend yield

Total amount of dividends received during the life of a futures contract or total dividends received for holding a particular stock one year. See: Current yield.

Expected Dividend Yield

The yield an investor expects to receive over one year when he/she purchases a stock or other security that pays dividends. The dividend yield is the amount an investor receives in dividends in one year divided by the purchase price of the security. The expected dividend yield is what the investor expects to receive at purchase, rather than what he/she actually receives. While calculating the expected dividend yield has a role in making investment decisions, it is important to note that the expected dividend yield may not match up with the actual dividend yield. See also: Expected return, Actual return.
References in periodicals archive ?
The attractive valuations of Qatari markets offer an opportunity for the investors to enter at the current levels coupled with an expected dividend yield of 5.
Maximum expected dividend yield based on current prices is provided bysales companies of Samara (27%) and Rostov (19%).
Batelco's expected dividend yield of 10pc is the highest in the GCC telecom sector, but competitive pressures in Bahrain will continue to hurt the company's earnings, Lakhotia wrote in a note.
Batelco's expected dividend yield of 10 percent is the highest in the Gulf Cooperation Council telecom universe, but competitive pressures in Bahrain will continue to hurt the company's earnings, Lakhotia wrote in a note dated Feb.
4 times its 2011 earnings and a 2012 expected dividend yield of 6.
The model assumes that stock prices will increase at the risk-free interest rate (B15) minus the expected dividend yield (B16), then plus or minus the price volatility (B12) assumed for the stock.
Brennan's (1970) pretax CAPM states that a security's expected pretax excess return is positively and linearly related to its systematic risk and its expected dividend yield.
The expected dividend yield during the option's expected term.
Litzenberger and Ramaswamy (1980) distinguish between the expected dividend yield in an ex-dividend month and the yield in a non-ex-dividend month.
At the same time, we know that at current prices, the expected dividend yield for our portfolio will be high.
For the rest of the companies, the change in expected dividend yield is explained solely by changes in share market price.
160 for FY 2010 and expected dividend yield for 2011 is around 10 per cent.

Full browser ?