Expected Family Contribution


Also found in: Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Expected Family Contribution

The amount that a student and his/her family are calculated to be able to pay for an academic year at a post-secondary educational institution. The expected family contribution is used in the FAFSA system. It is calculated by taking the tuition and subtracting the federal financial aid for which the student is eligible.
References in periodicals archive ?
COA, less the expected family contribution, equals financial need.
Colleges awarding scholarships, grants, loans and work-study programs based on the student's financial need use the following formula: Financial need = cost of attendance (COA) - expected family contribution (EFC).
There are many student loans available and you can qualify for the loans that best fit your expected family contribution.
Families can "count" the student with ID as household member enrolled in college which will affect the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) in a positive manner.
64% is used to calculate the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) which is based on assets and income.
Those found to have a greater ability are asked to pay more - the fearsome Expected Family Contribution.
Goggin added that the committee also plans to release a report in January on simplifying the Expected Family Contribution calculation.
Most federal aid, including Pell Grants and student loans, and some state and institutional aid are awarded based on a student's cost of attendance less the student's and/or family's ability to pay these costs--known as the expected family contribution (EFC).
The processed form also produces the Expected Family Contribution (EFC), which measures the family's financial strength and determines the student's federal financial-aid eligibility.
This confirms information from the FAFSA and provides the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) number.
You can choose to pay all or a portion of your expected family contribution through a tuition payment plan.
ConnectEDU's web tools provide users with a deeper understanding of the key components of the college financial aid process including how to: 1) fill out forms including the FAFSA, 2) determine a family's Expected Family Contribution (EFC), 3) utilize comparison tools to examine two financial aid award packages from two institutions side by side, and 4) find sources of aid including local scholarships as well as federal and private loans.

Full browser ?