Exogenous

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Related to Exogenous variables: endogenous variables

Exogenous

Describes facts outside the control of the firm. Converse of endogenous.

Exogenous

1. Describing anything outside a company's control. For example, a company may fail because of a recession even if it does everything right. In this case, the recession is an exogenous factor.

2. See: Independent Variable.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since our source data for the exogenous variables can be collected monthly, quarterly, or annually, we forecast annual totals for crossings and then use the calculated monthly seasonal indices to generate monthly forecasts.
With respect to total effects, irrespective of illness complexity, the impact of exogenous variables tends to be much smaller than the effect of latent variables (Table 2).
The real interest rate IR is added as exogenous variable in our study.
The results showed that exogenous variables of consideration, coordination, and skill had significant indirect effect on academic performance through inherent and incremental intelligence.
Note: Bold text denotes exogenous variable is indicated with #.
As with the national results, eigenvalue and trace statistics indicate the existence of only one significant cointegrating vector using each set of exogenous variables and assuming no time trends in the variables or vector (Table 3).
The maximum profits can be estimated as a function of exogenous variables X directly from equation 1 above.
the number of lags to include, the number of cointegrating relations to assume, the long-run restrictions to impose, and the data-generating processes to adopt for the exogenous variables.
The Ricardian model is a reduced form model that examines how several exogenous variables, F, H, Z and G, affect farm value.
In fact, most of the endogenous and exogenous variables they examined altered peptide ion intensities.
The model included three exogenous variables, five endogenous variables, and five error variables, one for each of the endogenous variables.
The Killing Trap also introduces into the study of genocide such exogenous variables as international and regional security and the role of international actors, which are not found in most explanatory models of genocide.