European Currency Unit


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Related to European Currency Unit: European Monetary System

European Currency Unit (ECU)

An index of foreign exchange consisting of European currencies, originally devised in 1979. Also see Euro.

European Currency Unit

Prior to the adoption of the euro, the ECU was set up as currency basket to provide a methodology for reconciling differing exchange rates between currencies who wished to participate in the single European currency. Established in the 1979, it was known as a "semi-pegged" system in which currencies were variable with respect to each other only within a certain range. After the introduction of the euro in 1999, the exchange rate mechanism was replaced by ERM II, which reconciles exchange rates for countries wishing to join the eurozone. See also: Exchange rate mechanism.

European Currency Unit (ECU)

A weighted index of the currencies of ten European Economic Community members. For bonds denominated in ECUs, U.S. investors risk not only the possibility of interest-rate increases but also the chance that the dollar will rise relative to the ECU (that is, one ECU will buy fewer dollars). On the plus side, these securities provide investors with the opportunity of overseas diversification without reliance on the currency of a single country.

European Currency Unit

see EUROPEAN MONETARY SYSTEM.

European Currency Unit (ECU)

the former monetary asset used by member countries of the EUROPEAN MONETARY SYSTEM (EMS) to value the EXCHANGE RATES of members’ currencies which are held as part of their INTERNATIONAL RESERVES to settle payment imbalances between members. The ECU was replaced in January 1999 with the introduction of a new currency, the EURO, as part of ECONOMIC AND MONETARY UNION.

Unlike other reserve assets such as GOLD, ECUs had no tangible life of their own. They were ‘created’ by the EMS's European Monetary Cooperation Fund in exchange for the in-payment of gold and other reserve assets by members and took the form of bookkeeping entries in a special account managed by the Fund. The value of the ECU was based on a weighted basket of members’ national currencies.

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Nasdaq: GTSG; Easdaq) announced today that its Hermes Europe Railtel (HER) subsidiary has acquired for European Currency Units (ECU) 90 million a majority interest in Ebone A/S, one of the largest Internet backbone providers in Europe.
According to the commission, exports from the five countries currently account for around 40% of the EU market, with a value of over 415 million European Currency Units (459 million dollars).
The tax had been levied at a rate of 23 European Currency Units per ton of oil (approximately 7.
According to the Kremlin, Russia also agreed to end oil export tariffs, currently at 20 European Currency Units (ECU's) per tonne (over US$3 per barrel) by July 1, 1996.
Dollars or, at the option of the Company, in other currencies including European Currency Units and may be offered in the United States and in the Euro-markets.
The GEOILBENT exemption provides relief from the oil export tariff currently at 23 European Currency Units per ton or approximately $4.
and a group of European banks to provide a three year credit facility of at least 29 million European Currency Units (ECU's), approximately U.
dollars or, at the option of the company, in other currencies, including European Currency Units.

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