European Economic Community

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European Economic Community (EEC)

A group of Western European countries that have joined together to promote trade and economic and political cooperation. Essentially, the EEC represents an attempt to combine a group of countries into a single economic unit. Also called Common Market.

European Economic Community

see EUROPEAN UNION.
References in periodicals archive ?
23) Hence, it might not be surprising if these law firms did not have pre-existing boilerplate contracts for sovereign issues into the Euromarket.
Judging from Lebanon's recent success in the Euromarkets and from Tunisia's recent credit rating of Baa3, Morocco should easily be able to float bonds at competitive international interest rates.
case by further extending the Euromarket in Africa to a new currency.
The process of financial deregulation in the United States and the United Kingdom and the spread of euromarkets make new sources of financing available.
The bulk of issuance in the Euromarket already takes place under such debt issuance programmes.
The court denied the summary judgment request, first determining that the case could move forward on its merits--because Euromarket had used the name "Crate & Barrel" in marketing and selling its wares--and then determining the jurisdictional issues.
The interest data are Euromarket rates, so capital restrictions cannot affect our results.
As far as international lending through the Euromarket is concerned, the available evidence points in the opposite direction: declining spreads over London Inter Bank Offered Rate (LIBOR) for borrowers in Latin America, whose creditworthiness was certainly doubtful.
The support of states was also important because every participant in the euromarket is a citizen of a sovereign state and potentially subject to that state's regulations.
Detectives yesterday admitted they were baffled by the fire at Euromarket in Station Road, Old Arley.
Over the past 20 years, the Euromarket has evolved into a sophisticated and deep capital market where borrowers (corporations, banks, sovereign governments, supra-national governmental agencies like the World Bank, and, slowly but surely, municipalities) can issue cost-effective bond or note financings in a wide range of alternative currencies, including the currency of the borrower.
The Yen has been relatively resistant in spite of the 5% negative interest rate differentials vis-a-vis the Dollar on a three-month Euromarket.