Ethics

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Ethics

Standards of conduct or moral judgment.

Ethics

The study and practice of appropriate behavior, regardless of the behavior's legality. Certain industries have professional organizations setting and promoting certain ethical standards. For example, an accountant may be required to refrain from engaging in aggressive accounting, even when a particular type of aggressive accounting is not illegal. Professional organizations may censure or revoke the licenses of those professionals who are found to have violated the ethical standards of their fields.

In investing, ethics helps inform the investment decisions of some individuals and companies. For example, an individual may have a moral objection to smoking and therefore refrain from investing in tobacco companies. Ethics may be both positive and negative in investing; that is, it may inform where an individual makes investments (e.g. in environmentally friendly companies) and where he/she does not (e.g. in arms manufacturers). Some mutual funds and even whole subdivisions are dedicated to promoting ethical investing. See also: Green fund, Islamic finance.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Chapter 3, "Moral Relativism," Kowalski explains this example of ethical theory by showing that morality is related to the group that is interpreting it.
Virtue-based ethical theory presents itself as the next logical alternative because it provides a basis for an internalized system for individuals' ethical reasoning.
The problem the authors note is that the search for a perfect ethical theory is centuries old--actually, I would note, it is millennia old--so it is unlikely that we will anytime soon have a universally acceptable ethical theory.
But prior to their publication, MacIntyre had already decided on a historical approach to the understanding of ethical theory that appears in his A Short History of Ethics, which employs a combination of historical and sociological approaches to describe the course of ethical theory in the West, proceeding from the ancient Greeks to the medievals, to the Scottish Enlightenment, Kant, utilitarianism, and twentieth-century ethicists including G.
Goodman points out several differences between Aristotelian virtue ethics and universalist perfectionist consequentialism, and uses them as a test to determine the sort of ethical theory that best corresponds to the ethical teachings of diverse Sanskrit sutras and two classical Indian Buddhist thinkers, Santideva and Asariga.
At the same time, the ethical theory and the understanding of conscience that Moyar attributes, I think rightly, to Hegel avoids the subjectivism associated with an abstract notion of conscience by requiring that the value of our actions follows from socially available and universal purposes and standards of right.
These interventions include elements of lecture, guest-speaking appearances, video exemplars, case analyses using an ethical decision-making framework, philosophic studies of ethical theory, and reflective analysis.
Results from the 2003 study suggested that business practitioners at the time relied on a combination of "act and rule utilitarian ethical philosophy" This ethical theory says that, when an individual makes a decision, the best choice is one that provides the greatest good, regardless of laws or socially acceptable behavior.
He possessed a broad expertise in ethical theory as well as economics, earning two divinity degrees from Concordia Seminary in St.
This book offers an exercise in comparative ethical theory and argues that Buddhist ethics is best interpreted as a kind of consequentialism.
As Jacqueline Marina notes, "Despite the importance of Schleiermacher's ethical theory, it has received little attention in the English-speaking world.