Statism

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Related to Etatist: Etatism, statist

Statism

1. In political science, the theory that the state exercises (or should exercise) control over a society and for that reason is a major engine of social change.

2. See: State capitalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
We may admit, beyond the critics for the pro-giving birth etatist politics of which we have discussed above, that the Romanian state needs politics of enhancing birth rate.
Rightly, one of Marquand's most powerful themes is Labour's unhelpfully unyielding attachment (whether in its 'Old' or 'New' guises) to centralizing etatist verities.
Chapter by Hemerijck and Vail show that Germany and Holland have modified the traditional corporatist role of 'social partners,' while the etatist models of France and Japan have been transformed from industrial policy to different forms of intervention (Levy Muira and Park on France and Japan).
The first is an assumption that the private sector was severely constrained by public ownership and strict etatist policies including allocation and pricing policies that distort economic incentives and outcomes.
Brandenberger argues that it was not genuine nationalist sentiment that induced the Soviet leaders to turn to "national Bolshevism"; rather, they used Russian history and russocentric images to promote an etatist agenda and build support for the communist state.
Because Brandenberger is trying to argue that Stalinist etatist rhetoric created modern Russian national identity, he also systematically underestimates the role of pre-revolutionary and early Soviet Russian national identity in shaping the later development of russo-centrism and Russian chauvinism.
Accordingly, the discursive field of emerging sociology might be viewed as a tripartite space embracing a centre, occupied by the French positivist tradition, and two peripheries or "wings," Western and Eastern/Southern, which accommodate the Anglosaxon liberal-utilitarian and the mid-and south-European etatist traditions.
But although the battle for etatism was clearly won, since there were no defenders of the liberal model of minimal state intervention, the debate over the form of an etatist development model continued.
The etatist provision of telecom services was replaced by a new regime which was based on a mixture of regulations, reregulations, and deregulations.
For Europeans with their stronger etatist tradition, states can enter such coalitions without having to fear that they will have to compromise core political and administrative values.
Although superior to capitalism ("in etatist societies the broad masses live longer, receive more education, and enjoy much better medical care" [49]), it created alienation among workers, unnecessary human suffering, and much waste (though not as much as capitalism).
But only to add immediately, and seemingly unconvinced: "although Japan, the etatist European countries, and recent events in Korea all suggest that such measures and political democracy are compatible.