Entry Level Job

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Entry Level Job

A job available to a person with academic or some other qualification but little practical experience in the area. For example, a recent graduate engineer may take an entry level job at a firm where he/she assists a senior engineer in his/her own projects. An entry level job may give one the opportunity to develop experience and may lead to advancement of one's career. However, some entry level jobs do not pay well.
References in periodicals archive ?
Graduates are trained for entry-level positions in their chosen fields through curricula that emphasize actual job skills and competencies necessary for success in the field.
The Stay Work Play Challenge Grant incentive program is open to any company that employs individuals working in New Hampshire in an entry-level position.
Unfortunately, I did not do an internship while I was in school I'm currently looking for an entry-level position since I don't have experience.
Dillon began at Gaylord in the entry-level position of process engineer and rose to vice president of primary production and mill operations.
Meter reading is an entry-level position at Unitil, and Mr.
Peyrefitte started his career with the Solomon Organization with an entry-level position in the firm's accounting department and most recently has served as the company's controller.
You usually start at an entry-level position, gain experience and let others get to know you.
It is a basic entry-level position and applicants with double firsts and shelves of publications are massively overqualified.
Training on the latest John Deere equipment by company- and dealer-trained instructors will enable students to enter the job market immediately at an entry-level position upon graduation.
Most importantly, they will build exactly the right experiences that will qualify them for any entry-level position in a tough job market, regardless of the career they choose.
The mix of public health and clinical dietetic functions evident in over one-quarter of entry-level position descriptions reflects the varied service and practice mix of many community health-based nutrition positions found in earlier workforce surveys (1,27).
Because of the high burnout rate," says DeWolf, "a person who has the ability to go on to a higher functioning type of job with advanceable skills won't stay in an entry-level position, per se.