Enronitis

Enronitis

Informal; the attribution of a share price decline to bad accounting. The word derives from the Enron scandal of 2001.
References in periodicals archive ?
248) See Greenwood, Enronitis, supra note 7, at 840-41 (arguing that, "shifting power from the market to managers or boards they effectively dominate" will simply enable managers and directors to "steal more freely"); Leung, supra note 205, at 622-23 (arguing that, "[i]f the power to consider stakeholder interests is left to the discretion of directors, this discretion may never be used," because directors "owe their positions to shareholders, not stakeholders, and will therefore act to benefit the former").
However, Greenwood does revisit these issues in a later 2004 article, Greenwood, Enronitis, supra note 10, that I will discuss infra in Part V of this Article.
The losses amongst pension funds and portfolio managers will be huge and the whole Enronitis wound has been ripped right open once again.
Paul Horne, an independent market economist, and Albert Merlin of Incopar of France for "Does Enronitis Threaten the Dollar and the Economy?
The telecom, and consequently horizontal directional drilling, meltdown continued; Enronitis is still negatively impacting the energy industry, thus slowing to a crawl capital spending on many pipeline projects and slowing growth in the distribution market; and though sewer and water has held its own, cities are understandably cautious regarding the state of their economies and future federal aid.
In this era of Department of Labor fee scrutiny and ENRONitis, compliance with a prudent investment theory has never been more of a focus; E401k is the best partner an investor can have.
Infectious enronitis A disease of accounting practices that spread widely throughout US businesses.
For an interesting, insightful but definitely inaccurate description of Enron, before Enronitis became apparent, see Kaminski and Martin (2002).
On the same day that a 220-point drop in the Dow Jones Industrial Average was blamed on Enronitis, Superior Financial Corp.
Paul Horne, Independent Market Economist, formerly with Salomon Smith Barney, and Albert Merlin, Incopar (Intl Consulting Partners), France, "Does Enronitis Threaten the Dollar and the Economy?