Energy Tax Incentives Act of 2005

(redirected from Energy Tax Incentives Act)

Energy Tax Incentives Act of 2005

Legislation in the United States that provided $14.5 billion in tax deductions and tax credits for businesses and individuals who invest in energy conservation, renewable energy, domestically-produced fossil fuels and/or energy infrastructure.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the federal side, the Energy Tax Incentives Act of 2005 (ETIA) created a variety of incentives that make energy efficiency tax-efficient as well.
President Bush recently approved the Energy Tax Incentives Act of 2005, which contains more than $14 billion in tax cuts.
Bush signed into law the Energy Tax Incentives Act (Energy Act) of 2005.
In addition to Norton's initiative, which is subject to public comment, four key Senate committee chairmen introduced a 2003 energy tax bill called Energy Tax Incentives Act of 2003 (S.
Clean Renewable Energy Bonds ("CREBs"), created under the Energy Tax Incentives Act of 2005, may be used by most municipal governments, electric coops and certain not-for-profit entities.
The Energy Tax Incentives Act of 2005 is another tax time benefit available to homeowners who made certain home renovations to improve energy efficiency in 2007.
The Energy Tax Incentives Act (ETIA) of 2005, which created more than $14 billion in tax breaks for businesses and consumers, offers significant tax benefits to home builders, home owners, and commercial building owners who make their properties more energy efficient.
The Energy Tax Incentives Act of 2005 (ETIA), which took four years to pass, added new Sec.
Since the Energy Tax Incentives Act of 2005 became law, there has been confusion about how it relates to commercial vehicle fleets.
The credit was included in the Energy Tax Incentives Act of 2005, which provides reductions in tax owed for people who buy energy-saving water heaters and cooling systems and retrofit their homes for solar energy.
Full browser ?