Empire-Building

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Related to Empire building: Empire State Building

Empire-Building

The act or practice of a manager or employee attempting to increase his/her influence over the company for which he/she works without regard for what is best for the company. A variety of factors may influence empire-building, such as the possibility for a higher salary or simply the prestige that comes from being an important person. Empire-building is frowned upon in most sectors, as it does not benefit shareholders and can in fact harm them if an empire-builder is neglecting the actual business at hand.
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Empire building is the pinnacle and most extreme level of the pyramid of bureaucracy .
Empire building and the re-creation of the district councils is not what this exercise has been about.
Paradoxically the defeats and decline of US military directed empire building has been accompanied by the retreat of the anti-war movements in North America and Western Europe and the sharp decline of political parties and regimes opposing US imperialism in all the advanced capitalist countries.
The author uses a chronological approach beginning with the pirate Henry Morgan, whose 17th-century raids in the Caribbean marked the first step in empire building.
Empire building was the dominant activity for 300 years and as empires go it wasn't bad.
God has been part of empire building throughout history.
It seems from his July Margin Notes ("There's no defense for this budget") that Kevin Clarke apparently has bought into the liberal anthem currently making its way through the salons of Beverly Hills and the halls of many of our universities, which asserts that the United States is committed to empire building.
Rejecting popular functional models of the history play as homily, as providential advocacy, and as prototype for empire building (as in Michael Neill's recent Putting History to the Question: Power, Politics, and Society in English Renaissance Drama), Benjamin Griffin chooses to examine "native-subject" drama- plays portraying the lives of powerful individuals from the past of England and its neighbors - and to find its source in medieval drama.
As intellectual history, Guterl's book excels, providing a fascinating view into how immigration and migration, Progessive Era politics, world war, and empire building shaped the ways elite blacks and whites envisioned themselves in relation to one another.
At a recent event in England, the Archbishop of Canterbury asked Secretary of State Colin Powell if our plans for Iraq were just an example of empire building by President George W.
As it turns out, neither feminists nor feminism are immune to empire building by currying favor with the Jewish establishment.
It will cost a fortune but will present marvellous opportunities for empire building.