Emergency Banking Act of 1933


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Emergency Banking Act of 1933

Legislation in the United States that was used to respond to the banking crisis of the Great Depression quickly until more long-lasting legislation could be passed. It established regulations for the orderly liquidation of banks that could not be saved and the reorganization of those that could. It also gave the President power to declare a national banking emergency, which would give the President complete control over the nation's finances and render it illegal for banks to operate without presidential approval. It was largely replaced later in 1933 by the Glass-Steagal Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Emergency Banking Act of 1933, passed by Congress on March 9-combined with the Federal Reserve's commitment to supply unlimited amounts of currency to reopened banks--created de facto 100 percent deposit insurance.
421-2) simply review the provisions of the Emergency Banking Act of 1933 and do not recognize the implicit guarantee for deposits in the reopened banks.
The evidence presented here on the speed with which the Bank Holiday and the Emergency Banking Act of 1933 reestablished the integrity of the payments system demonstrates the power of credible regime-shifting policies.
Section 3 reviews the reasons for the suspension, and Section 4 describes the solution to the crisis: the Emergency Banking Act of 1933.
24) The link to Aldrich-Vreeland currency, which succeeded in defusing the financial crisis at the outbreak of World War I, conferred credibility on the power of Title IV of the Emergency Banking Act of 1933.
Congress passed the Emergency Banking Act of 1933, giving the President the power to restore confidence in the banking system by establishing 100 percent guarantees for bank deposits.
193), as we discuss, the President's opposition did not interfere with his commitment to the success of de facto depositor protection that began with the earlier Emergency Banking Act of 1933.
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