Elle

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Elle

A German unit of length. Its measure varied in different German-speaking areas, but generally was between 400 and 800 millimeters. It became obsolete with the adoption of the metric system in the 1870s.
References in classic literature ?
King talking very loud, and Grace and Ellen turned away their faces when they passed me, so I shouldn't see how red and swollen their eyes were.
Joe is working over at the `pigeon house'--that's the name Ellen gives it, because it's so small and looks like a pigeon house--and some one has to do this.
Willie rang the bell, and asked if Miss Blomefield or Miss Ellen was at home.
Well, that was just the way Eliza Jane was taken, and Ellen and Maria Sanders.
One of them must have," said Miss Ellen Burnham, "for the girl that was selling soap at the Ladds' in North Riverboro was described by Adam Ladd as the most remarkable and winning child he ever saw.
Ellen, help Miss Catherine off with her things - Stay, dear, you will disarrange your curls - let me untie your hat.
Just as he was goin' away our 'Lizabeth Ellen called out, `Mother, he's got skippin'-ropes with red an' blue handles.
Our correspondent naively says that even Ellen Terry could not be so winningly attractive as some of these grubby-faced little children pretend, and even imagine themselves, to be.
They lay piled up in stacks of mighty boles, and it was hard to believe that all this mass of dead and stripped trees had come out of the flanks of a slender, innocent-looking little barque with, as likely as not, a homely woman's name - Ellen this or Annie that - upon her fine bows.
When she opened them she was looking at her mother's maiden name, fairly carved on a blue flagstone on the pew floor: Ellen Lashmar.
But they had; they undoubtedly had; for the low- toned comments behind him left no doubt in Archer's mind that the young woman was May Welland's cousin, the cousin always referred to in the family as "poor Ellen Olenska.
So he told them how he had come from York to the sweet vale of Rother, traveling the country through as a minstrel, stopping now at castle, now at hall, and now at farmhouse; how he had spent one sweet evening in a certain broad, low farmhouse, where he sang before a stout franklin and a maiden as pure and lovely as the first snowdrop of spring; how he had played and sung to her, and how sweet Ellen o' the Dale had listened to him and had loved him.