Electronic Communications Privacy Act


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Electronic Communications Privacy Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1986, that protects most communication sent over a computer network from search or seizure without a warrant. The Act requires law enforcement officials to abide by the same requirements for computer communications as they do for telephone communications. Exemptions established by the Act, such as access to records kept by service providers, have proven controversial.
References in periodicals archive ?
140) See Electronic Communications Privacy Act Hearing, supra note 95, at 34.
The initial passage of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986, which (for all its faults) largely protected e-mail communications and other online interactions at a time when few Americans owned or used personal computers, is a testament to the lasting power of legislation.
Laws that set the boundaries of government cyber activity include the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the Stored Communications Act, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, the Federal Information Security Management Act, the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act, and the laws governing intelligence collection.
Electronic Mail, Privacy, and the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986.
The Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 provides employers a number of exceptions that allow for the monitoring of employee communications.
The Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 essentially prohibits the monitoring of wire transfers while in transit or in storage without a court order, warrant, or administrative subpoena.
The Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 (ECPA)(19) prohibits the intentional interception of wire, oral, and electronic communications.
Specht alleges that this 'continuing surveillance' and identifying cookies provides Netscape with a profile of each person's file transfers and the suit proposes that the company is in violation of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986.
28) These references spoke of Title III of the Omnibus Crime Control Act of 1968,(29) which, as amended by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986,(30) makes it a crime to intercept, use, or disclose the contents of a cellular transmission.
The only federal law that limits employer surveillance comes from the 1986 Electronic Communications Privacy Act, which bans employer eavesdropping on spoken personal conversations.
The pertinent law here is the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986.
According to a survey by Vox Populi Polling, 81% of Democratic voters and 76% of Republican voters in Iowa support an update to the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA), the 29-year-old law setting standards for government access to email and online communications.
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