Eggshell

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Eggshell

An obsolete Irish unit of volume approximately equivalent to 55 milliliters.
References in periodicals archive ?
CaO from eggshell is expected to be a catalyst for bio-oil production as the eggshells are eco-friendly and cheaper, which could reduce production cost.
Eggshells typically have a light background color with reddish brown speckles that are more concentrated at the wider end of the egg (Fig.
2+] ions in the synthetic wastewater by using waste eggshells.
Some of the eggshells, which belonged to two Jurassic-Era theropods, or a group of carnivorous dinosaurs, once harbored embryos of Torvosaurus, the largest predator of its day.
An eggshell is what remains when two different pairs of identical consonants are removed from a word.
Sales of bone health products such as Eggshell Calcium (ESC) powder from ESM Technologies, LLC, Carthage, MO, have remained strong and continue to grow thanks in part to an aging population of Baby Boomer women who are most vulnerable to age-related loss of bone mass.
All-natural eggshell membrane supplement determined to relieve pain and improve flexibility, proven safe and effective
Natural eggshell membrane (NEM) is an alternative choice for supporting joint health.
In the present paper it is proposed to apply hen eggshells as low-cost sorbent of lead.
She told officers her daughter had slapped her face and twisted her arm after she put eggshells in the wrong bin at the home the pair shared in School Lane, Gwaelod y Garth.
The eggshells were discovered at the Diepkloof Rock Shelter in South Africa, and over the last few years researchers have collected 270 shell fragments with scratch marks on them.
The stool, Tuffet, 2009, is just as fragile, and three more works made of eggshells from the same year are equally incongruous: Fist and Point, a clenched fist and a faceted arrowhead, are aggressive tools that would shatter harmlessly if you used them as such; while Bather, though the title may conjure Cezanne, is immediately recognizable as a copy of the Venus of Willendorf, a Paleolithic limestone figure famous for its massive sense of weight despite its four-inch height.