Ecotourist


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Ecotourist

A person or group that takes trips structured in a way that causes the least damage or has the least impact on the area visited. Ecotourists may also visit places of ecological interest. Ecotourism is considered sustainable and can be beneficial for the local economy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Establishment of restaurants and residences for ecotourists.
In terms of ecotourism, the danger is that first would tour companies and first world ecotourists run "ecotours" in poor countries without adequate regard for the local culture and economy.
Using classification of ecotourists introduced by Wright and Backman (1994), Honey (2008) as well as Kusler (1991), the ecotourists in Fraser Hill can be classified as the follows: (Table 1).
2010), Exploring the predisposition of travellers to qualify as ecotourists: The ecotourist predisposition scale, Journal of Ecotourism, 9, 45-61.
Travelling north, the ecotourist enters the Ashanti Region, home to one of the most powerful and famous cultures in all of Africa.
The ecotourist boom began in the mid-1980s; during the last half of the 1980s tourism in Monteverde increased 36 percent a year, and in the early 1990s it grew at a rate of 50 percent a year.
Becoming an ecotourist means looking at travel from a different perspective, seeing it not just for pleasure, but for a purpose too.
It features a pastiche of family-run operations that are often seen as mutually exclusive: a cattle ranch and a primary tropical forest; a scientific research base and ecotourist lodge; a fruit plantation and fledgling conservation center.
Unfortunately, the biggest ecotourist draws are the parks and wilderness areas most threatened by proposed oil pipelines.
During the interview in her Guatemala City office, Monterroso described the typical ecotourist as affluent, well-educated and genuinely concerned about preservation of the great variety of plants, animals and habitats in Central America, as well as the region's archaeological sites and indigenous cultures.
Sadly and increasingly," he laments, "the saying `better an ecotourist shark than a finned dead shark' is a reality.