Homo Economicus

(redirected from Economic Person)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Homo Economicus

A person that desires to maximize his/her needs or desires. Homo economicus is used most of the time to refer to the rational economic actor, who desires wealth, does not desire to work if it can be avoided, and is able to find ways achieve those ends. This assumption is accepted by many economists, especially those who follow rational choice theory, but it remains controversial. The concept of homo economicus was developed by utilitarian thinkers, and contrasts with the constructs of behavioral economics.
References in periodicals archive ?
economics, characterized the economic person as an "embodied
of Paris; France) aim to construct a concept of the economic person that moves beyond the amoral rationality understanding of most economic science and reincorporates the moral and places it in proper context to the rational.
Sheikha Moza Bint Nasser, Head of the Administrative Council of Qatar Institution for Education, Sciences and Social Development, the wife of Qatari Prince Sheikh Hamad Bin Khalifa Al-Thani, was elected the Female Person of 2010 in the Arab world, while Lebanese Central Bank Governor, Riad Salameh, was chosen the Economic Person of 2010 for four consecutive times.
He was honored the 2006 CCTV Top Economic Person of China.
The economic person is mainly interested in utility, self-preservation, the practical affairs of the business world, production, marketing, consumption, the use of economic resources, the elaboration of credit, and the accumulation of tangible wealth.
One of the chapters that passed both relevance and quality tests with good marks was Thanawala's, "The Economic Person in a Global Society.
5 /PRNewswire/ -- Visionary Vehicles Founder and CEO Malcolm Bricklin today proudly congratulated his friend and partner Chery Automobile Company President Yin Tongyao for winning China's prestigious Economic Person of the Year award for 2005.
Perhaps no one today understands the economic agent as person better than Danner (2002) in his The Economic Person.
Hess's reading of how Wordsworth constructed the Lake District as "a kind of open-air museum" (173) in his Guide through the District of the Lakes tends to reiterate points made in the second chapter: that it privileges a disembodied, stationed observer and empties the landscape of social and economic persons and activities.

Full browser ?