Ecology

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Related to Ecologists: ecology, ecological

Ecology

The study of how living things interact with their surroundings. For example, an ecologist may study how a plant operates in different types of soil or whether or not bacteria thrive in various environs. Ecology is important in sustainable development to ensure that an action does not irreparably harm an environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1985, based on the testimony of two clinical ecologists, a jury awarded $49.
We don't know why," says Janet Morrison, a forest ecologist who joined the NYBG staff in October 1994.
Pouyat, who is now a forest ecologist with the USDA Forest Service, decided to start his search for answers in the dirt.
Ecologists, physiologists, and other biologists appear to be unanimous on one point: The team's model has sparked a renaissance for biological-sealing theory.
So, the ecologists argue, it is important to reintroduce fire as a component of forest management.
They assisted staff ecologists with removing exotic plants and replacing dead plants and the restoration of the Potrero Creek at Ranch Sierra Vista/Satwiwa.
The dominant disturbances in the region--small-scale wind and ice storms, with an occasional 100-year hurricane--left a heterogeneous forest with a variety of tree ages and types, making more than 90 percent of New England an old-growth forest, according to ecologists Craig Lorimer and Charlie Cogbill.
Two vector ecologists, Paul O'Connor and Jacqueline Spoehel, find themselves at the front line of detecting the virus.
The CRM has been used for decades by population ecologists and others who count wildlife (LaPorte et al.
No one knows how many there are, but a recent estimate by wildlife ecologists put the number at over 31,000 in 12 western states.
Wildlife corridors which have become a common feature of urban planning and conservation over the past decade may make very little difference to the diversity of plants found in our towns and cities, ecologists in Birmingham have found.
Ecologists Marten Scheffer and Milena Holmgren of Wageningen University, The Netherlands, say some dry land can become fertile again by removing grazing animals when El Nino strikes -- about once every three to six years.