Eco-Label

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Eco-Label

A label attached to a consumer good indicating that it is energy efficient, was produced sustainably, or is otherwise environmentally friendly. Different jurisdictions have different rules governing what products may qualify for eco-labels. Some countries and industries have voluntary schemes with standards set by professional bodies, while others use mandatory, government-issued labels.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is about highlighting the good option, working with ecolabels and communication with the customers needs.
Global EPDs (Environmental Product Declarations) The first AENOR (Spanish Association for Standardization and Certification) Global EPDs were recently awarded to tile companies, making the Spanish tile sector among the first to be awarded type III ecolabels.
In response to broad stakeholder interest, it is seeking public input on these draft guidelines and a potential approach to assessing non-governmental environmental standards and ecolabels already in the marketplace.
As a result, it is an ideal choice for paint manufacturers seeking to carry ecolabels.
Along with the economic and product safety improvements, this approach fulfills the demand for ecolabels, like European Flower and the White Swan, as well as the stringent requirements of the German Oko Test magazine.
The microsite contains details about the products' application areas, the specific benefits that APGs bring to these markets, and shows manufacturers and formulators at a glance which ecolabels and certification bodies have already approved APG surfactants.
Among these ecolabels are those awarded by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) for seafood.
In the United States and in some Latin American countries, this practice is being effectively monitored, at least with regard to some agricultural ecolabels for foods cultivated using IPM.
But establishing fair and viable ecolabels is a challenge.
Many forest certification proponents claim that ecolabels are associated with increased sales, price premiums, or both.
Among the expected changes: the market will move from a sellers' to a buyers' market; prices will fall; buyers will reduce the number of sources; small firms will compete against large companies which enjoy economies of scale; and all firms will face new trade trends and additional market requirements, such as ecolabels and ethical trade requirements.