Hemorrhagic Fever

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Related to Ebola hemorrhagic fever: Ebola virus

Hemorrhagic Fever

Any virus that causes both fever and excessive bleeding due to the reduced ability of blood to coagulate. Hemorrhagic fevers are spread from person to person through respiration. As such, there is concern that hemorrhagic fevers have potential in bioweapons.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ebola hemorrhagic fever associated with novel virus strain, Uganda, 2007-2008.
Ebola hemorrhagic fever in Kikwit, Democratic Republic of the Congo: clinical observations in 103 patients.
Clinical, virologic, and immunologic follow-up of convalescent Ebola hemorrhagic fever patients and their household contacts, Kikwit, Democratic Republic of the Congo.
In addition to occurring during common forms of sepsis, a marked increase in lymphocyte apoptosis has been observed in such exotic illnesses as Ebola hemorrhagic fever.
Recent Ebola hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in humans have been traced to index patient contact with infected great apes that are hunted for food (15).
Moreover, superspreading events have also been reported in outbreaks of viral diseases such as Ebola hemorrhagic fever and rubella (3).
Ebola hemorrhagic fever (Ebola HF) is a severe, often-fatal disease in humans and nonhuman primates (monkeys, gorillas and chimpanzees) that has appeared sporadically since its initial recognition in 1976.
Ebola hemorrhagic fever occurs in rare epidemics, in which the index patient is often infected by an animal source, which indicates that Ebola hemorrhagic fever is a zoonotic disease (5).
A case of Ebola hemorrhagic fever was defined as any probable or laboratory-confirmed case, based on internationally recognized criteria (definition available from http://www.
In our era of telecommunication and rapid dissemination of information, Ebola hemorrhagic fever, recognized in 1976, took only 12 years to be fictionalized: in 1988, the medical thriller Outbreak by Robin Cook made Ebola a popularly dreaded name.
During the last decade of the 20th century, several outbreaks, including cholera in Latin America, pneumonic plague in India, and Ebola hemorrhagic fever in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, caused great international concern (1-3).
The diseases caused by filoviruses are termed Ebola hemorrhagic fever (HF; diseases caused by Ebola viruses) and Marburg HF (diseases caused by Marburg viruses).