Tiger Economy

(redirected from East Asian Tigers)

Tiger Economy

A collective name given to the economies of East and Southeast Asia, which experienced nearly unprecedented growth, especially in the 1980s and early 1990s. The Asian financial crisis in the late 1990s ended the idea that the tiger economies were unstoppable, though most have recovered well and remain important players in the global economy. See also: Keiretsu, chaebol, ASEAN.
References in periodicals archive ?
Normally growth in exports is twice or more than the growth in GDP for most fast-growing economies particularly the East Asian Tigers.
Old East Asian Tigers (Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan, South Korea) 10 9.
It also could have assessed the role that foreign aid played in the economic success stories of the East Asian tigers (Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong) as well as newly industrializing countries such as Chile, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Thailand.
The development of the East Asian Tigers marked a blossoming of complexity in development debates, not a simplification that serves to sweep local priorities under the rug.
However, if a comparison is made with the East Asian Tigers, we notice that Pakistan has been left behind in the economic race.
Over the last two centuries, the experiences of the first wave of industrialized countries in Europe and the US, and the more recent experiences of the East Asian Tigers, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, China, India, and Vietnam, have illustrated the transformative nature of industrialization.
The East Asian tigers invested heavily in education, and it paid off in terms of a capable and modern workforce.
The East Asian tigers that pushed themselves onto the world economy's center stage were small units, and in some cases--Singapore, Taiwan, or Hong Kong--were not even treated as states.
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