Tiger Economy

(redirected from East Asian Tiger)

Tiger Economy

A collective name given to the economies of East and Southeast Asia, which experienced nearly unprecedented growth, especially in the 1980s and early 1990s. The Asian financial crisis in the late 1990s ended the idea that the tiger economies were unstoppable, though most have recovered well and remain important players in the global economy. See also: Keiretsu, chaebol, ASEAN.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rapid economic development of East Asian Tiger economies was heavily predicated on cultural norm-setting.
The East Asian tiger economy, which has the 11th largest GDP in the world, also invested heavily in science and technology, and expanded agriculture and energy sectors, becoming one of the fastest growing economies in the world through 1990s.
The rise of East Asian tiger economies has renewed attention to their being embedded in culture and society.
5) Western journalists sometimes called the successful economies of South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore East Asian tigers or East Asian tiger economies, and the author of this work uses the term, East Asian model, and East Asian tigers interchangeably.
It brings earlier work by the authors on the East Asian Tiger economies up to the year 2005.
The US, Switzerland, Japan and China remain the big four partner countries, while NAFTA, EFTA and the East Asian tiger economies stay in place as the most important regions trading with Europe.
This will ensure that we can move on from the world order being imposed on us, to what actually suits us for economic growth and development, as done by the South East Asian Tigers, such as South Korea.
A 1997 World Bank (WB) working paper explained that the faster growth rate of the working-age population in Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan contributed heavily to the "economic miracles" these East Asian Tigers experienced between 1965 and 1990.
For Japan, the Korean peninsula, Mongolia and China in the East Asia, for East Asian tigers and the coast-less central Asian countries, a functional port in Gwadar jointly owned by Pakistan and China will dramatically bring Pakistan as the focal point of international trade.
However, the term "developmental state" only gained prominence in policy discourses following the rapid rise of the East Asian Tigers in the global political economy between the 1960s and late 1980s.
the East Asian tigers have a successful history of fostering a developmental state).
Over the last two centuries, the experiences of the first wave of industrialized countries in Europe and the US, and the more recent experiences of the East Asian Tigers, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, China, India, and Vietnam, have illustrated the transformative nature of industrialization.
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