Earmark


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Earmark

1. To set aside money to use only for a certain, stated purpose. Earmarking is common in both personal savings and in corporate finance, as well as in government. For example, an individual may earmark reserves for his/her honeymoon and a company may do the same to pay off bonds when they mature. Likewise, a politician may earmark government funds for a project in his/her district. When politicians earmark funds, the word takes on a slightly negative connotation. See also: Pork barrel spending.

2. Money that has been earmarked.
References in periodicals archive ?
Congress, for a number of years, insisted on buying new planes, over administration objections, and the earmark moratorium would not prevent that.
When an earmark is approved, the Congressmen or senator who secured it can, if he or she chooses, return to his or her home district or state and meet face to face with the people that earmark is going to help.
these earmarks are a great example," he said, adding that Santorum "loaded up his bills with Pennsylvania pork.
McConnell has enjoyed being able to serve as the earmark czar for his home state.
On April 3, 2009, Kirkpatrick made $4,608,500 in earmark requests for Northern Arizona University (NAU).
Under new reforms, members of Congress posted their earmark requests on their Web sites for the first time this year.
After Americans United and its allies protested the earmark, Vitter agreed to direct the money elsewhere.
The inspector general estimated each earmark grantee got about six hours of attention that year.
Trent Lott (R-MS), requires that any earmark attached to a bill in a conference report after the legislation has already passed the chamber will be subject to a point of order.
I was at a meeting on earmark reform a few weeks ago," he said, "and someone asked the question whether there's a constitutional right to earmarks.
A handful of congressmen use this situation to earmark grant funds designed to help healthcare providers other than nursing homes for political benefit.